Serving the San Francisco Bay Area New Music Community

                 

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive

2155 Center St.
Berkeley CA   
The UC Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive is the visual arts center of the University of California, Berkeley, the nation’s leading public research university. Our mission is to inspire the imagination and ignite critical dialogue through art and film, engaging audiences from the UC Berkeley campus, the Bay Area, and beyond. Each year BAMPFA presents more than twenty art exhibitions, 450 film programs, and dozens of performances, as well as lectures, symposia, and tours. Learn more about our history.

Collections
The Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive’s comprehensive collection—more than 19,000 works of art and 17,500 films and videos—is characterized by artistic excellence and innovation, intellectual exploration, and social commentary. Representing a tremendous diversity of global cultures and historical periods, the collection has particular strengths in Ming and Qing dynasty Chinese painting, Mughal dynasty Indian miniature painting, Baroque painting, old master prints and drawings, early American painting, nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century photography, Conceptual art, and international contemporary art, classic and international cinema, West Coast avant-garde film, international animation, Soviet cinema, early video art, and the largest collection of Japanese films outside of Japan. BAMPFA’s Modern collection is built around a remarkable core holding of fifty paintings by the Abstract Expressionist painter and teacher Hans Hofmann and includes significant works by Mark Rothko, Helen Frankenthaler, Ad Reinhardt, Jackson Pollock, David Smith, and Clyfford Still.

Exhibitions
BAMPFA offers one of the most distinguished and provocative programs of art and film exhibitions in North America, reflecting the diverse interests of the University and Bay Area communities. Each year, we present and important temporary exhibitions that range from classical Asian art to challenging work by today’s artists. 
Our exhibition program includes installations that highlight the richness and scope of our collections, recent avant-garde work presented in the MATRIX Program, thematic exhibitions, artist retrospectives, and the annual UC Berkeley MFA exhibition. We have mounted important exhibitions of the works of Ant Farm, Joe Brainard, Joan Brown, Theresa Hak Kyung Cha, Robert Colescott, Jay DeFeo, Juan Gris, Eva Hesse, Paul Kos, Robert Mapplethorpe, Barry McGee, Richard Misrach, Bruce Nauman, Peter Paul Rubens, Martin Puryear, Sebastião Salgado, William Wiley, and many others, as well as thematic exhibitions such as Made in U.S.A.: An Americanization in Modern Art, the ‘50s & ‘60s; State of Mind: New California Art Circa 1970; In a Different Light: Visual Culture, Sexual Identity, Queer Practice; Human/Nature: Artists Respond to a Changing Planet; and Masterworks of Chinese Painting: In Pursuit of Mists and Clouds.
http://bampfa.org/

Upcoming Events:
Saturday, September 23 2017 4:00 PM
The charming Mississippi River setting (actually filmed along the Sacramento Delta) is but one of Steamboat Bill, Jr.’s many pleasures. The film seems to have a direct line to Buster Keaton’s youth and soul in the tale of a sensitive lad trying to figure out the mettle of manhood in his overbearing dad. The climax is one of Keaton’s most dangerous and carefully planned stunts: a wall comes crashing down on him but he passes, untouched, through an open window. Keaton was the true he-man among matinee idols—the scene was done unfaked, with a real wall.  More...

Sunday, September 24 2017 3:00 PM
“Music is our refuge,” says a student at the Sainte Trinité Music School in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. “With music . . . we feel we are in another world, far from troubles.” Owsley Brown’s vibrant documentary recognizes the troubles but celebrates the refuge, testifying to the role that music can play in creating community and sustaining hope under the most difficult of circumstances. Shot in Port-au-Prince over a period of years both before and after the 2010 earthquake that killed hundreds of thousands and reduced much of the city to rubble, Serenade for Haiti finds a locus of continuity at Sainte Trinité, which has been training young people in classical European and Haitian musical traditions since the 1950s. Replete with vivid images and sounds, the film focuses on interviews with students—most of them poor, some orphaned by political violence—and their teachers, many former students themselves. All speak eloquently about how the discipline of music has helped them discover their own voices and value in the world. After the quake, with the school’s stately white buildings in ruins, lessons and practice continue outdoors, maintaining a rhythm of resilience. In one teacher’s words, “The country is destroyed. All the buildings are destroyed. Music must go on. Life goes on.”  More...

Saturday, September 30 2017 6:15 PM
“Music is our refuge,” says a student at the Sainte Trinité Music School in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. “With music . . . we feel we are in another world, far from troubles.” Owsley Brown’s vibrant documentary recognizes the troubles but celebrates the refuge, testifying to the role that music can play in creating community and sustaining hope under the most difficult of circumstances. Shot in Port-au-Prince over a period of years both before and after the 2010 earthquake that killed hundreds of thousands and reduced much of the city to rubble, Serenade for Haiti finds a locus of continuity at Sainte Trinité, which has been training young people in classical European and Haitian musical traditions since the 1950s. Replete with vivid images and sounds, the film focuses on interviews with students—most of them poor, some orphaned by political violence—and their teachers, many former students themselves. All speak eloquently about how the discipline of music has helped them discover their own voices and value in the world. After the quake, with the school’s stately white buildings in ruins, lessons and practice continue outdoors, maintaining a rhythm of resilience. In one teacher’s words, “The country is destroyed. All the buildings are destroyed. Music must go on. Life goes on.”  More...

Thursday, October 5 2017 7:00 PM
Full: Orchestra Di Pazzi

Programmed by Sarah Cahill

Orchestra Di Pazzi is a large improvising orchestra created by Scott Amendola to explore various combinations of musicians on a large scale, creating new musical textures for each unique performance. For this show, the ensemble includes Scott Amendola (director, drums/electronics), Aurora Josephson (voice), Fred Frith (guitar), Crystal Pascucci (cello), Christina Stanley (violin), Ben Goldberg (clarinet), Phillip Greenlief (saxophone), Jon Raskin (saxophone), Karl Evangelista (guitar), Bruce Ackley (saxophone), Rob Sudduth (saxophone), Kasey Knudsen (saxophone), Jason Hoopes (electric bass), Zachary James Watkins (guitar/electronics), and more.  More...

Sunday, October 8 2017 2:00 PM
“Music is our refuge,” says a student at the Sainte Trinité Music School in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. “With music . . . we feel we are in another world, far from troubles.” Owsley Brown’s vibrant documentary recognizes the troubles but celebrates the refuge, testifying to the role that music can play in creating community and sustaining hope under the most difficult of circumstances. Shot in Port-au-Prince over a period of years both before and after the 2010 earthquake that killed hundreds of thousands and reduced much of the city to rubble, Serenade for Haiti finds a locus of continuity at Sainte Trinité, which has been training young people in classical European and Haitian musical traditions since the 1950s. Replete with vivid images and sounds, the film focuses on interviews with students—most of them poor, some orphaned by political violence—and their teachers, many former students themselves. All speak eloquently about how the discipline of music has helped them discover their own voices and value in the world. After the quake, with the school’s stately white buildings in ruins, lessons and practice continue outdoors, maintaining a rhythm of resilience. In one teacher’s words, “The country is destroyed. All the buildings are destroyed. Music must go on. Life goes on.”  More...