Serving the San Francisco Bay Area New Music Community

                 
CCRMA
660 Lomita Dr.
Stanford CA 94305  

The Stanford Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA) is a multi-disciplinary facility where composers and researchers work together using computer-based technology both as an artistic medium and as a research tool.

Pronouncing "CCRMA":
CCRMA is an acronym for the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics it is pronounced "karma" (the first "c" is silent).

Areas of ongoing interest:
Composition, Applications Hardware, Applications Software, Synthesis Techniques and Algorithms, Physical Modeling, Music and Mobile Devices, Sensors, Real-Time Controllers, Signal Processing, Digital Recording and Editing, Psychoacoustics and Musical Acoustics, Perceptual Audio Coding, Music Information Retrieval, Audio Networking, Auditory Display of Multidimensional Data (Data Sonification), and Real-Time Applications.

The CCRMA community:
Administrative and technical staff, faculty, research associates, graduate research assistants, graduate and undergraduate students, visiting scholars, visiting researchers and composers, and industrial associates. Departments actively represented at CCRMA include Music, Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Computer Science, Physics, Art, Drama, and Psychology.

Center activities:
Academic courses, seminars, small interest group meetings, summer workshops and colloquia. Concerts of computer music are presented several times each year, including exchange concerts with area computer music centers. In-house technical reports and recordings are available, and public demonstrations of ongoing work at CCRMA are held periodically.

Research results:
Are published and presented at professional meetings, international conferences and in established journals including the Computer Music Journal, Journal of the Audio Engineering Society, the Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, and various transactions of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE). Compositions are presented in new music festivals and radio broadcasts throughout the world and have been recorded on cassette, LP, and compact disk.

CCRMA affiliation:
The Center for Computer Assisted Research in the Humanities (CCARH), also located at Stanford. CCARH conducts research on constructing computer databases for music, and on creating programs that allow researchers to access, analyze, print, and electronically perform the music. This focus is complementary to research at CCRMA in several ways.

Support for CCRMA:
The late Doreen B. Townsend, Walter Hewlett, the California Arts Council, the Ann and Gordon Getty Foundation, the Mellon Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Science Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation (for artists-in-residence), the System Development Foundation, Apple Computer, ATR Human Information Processing Research Labs, Aureal Semiconductor, Bio Control, Crystal Semiconductor, Digidesign, Dynacord, E-mu, Fast Mathematical Algorithms and Hardware, Fender Musical Instruments Corporation, Hewlett Packard, IBM Computer Music Center, Interval Research, ITRI CCL Taiwan, Kind of Loud Technologies, Korg, Matsushita, Media Vision, McDSP, NEC, NeXT Computer, Nokia Group, NTT Communication Science Laboratories, Opcode Systems, Philips Semiconductors, Rockwell International, Roland, Sony, Symbolics, Texas Instruments, Universal Audio/Kind of Loud Technologies, Xerox Palo Alto Research Center, Yamaha, Young Chang R&D Institute, Zeta Music Partners, and private gifts.
https://ccrma.stanford.edu/

Upcoming Events:
Sunday, February 12 2023 7:30 PM
Distractfold performs new works by Stanford graduate composers Celeste Betancur, Seán Ó Dálaigh, Lemon Guo, Kimia Koochakzadeh-Yazdi, Mike Mulshine.

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FREE and Open to the Public

Face coverings are strongly recommended. We encourage you to continue wearing masks for the comfort of our audience members, artists, and staff.

Directions, parking, accessibility: https://music.stanford.edu/venues-facilities/venues/ccrma-stage

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UK-based ensemble, Distractfold, are a group of performers, composers and curators all acting out of shared love, passion and interest in the music and culture of our times. Coming from different continents, backgrounds and having received a diverse education, together they create a nexus of ideas and influences which all contribute towards the ensemble’s unique voice and identity. They perform acoustic, mixed and electroacoustic music of their peers, alongside music of the more established composers with whom they have formed close collaborations and friendships.

In 2014 Distractfold became the first ever UK ensemble to be awarded the Kranichstein Prize for Interpretation at the 47th International Summer Course for New Music in Darmstadt. In 2016 they returned to Darmstadt presenting two programmes of music at the Centralstation and curated a CD featuring remixes and reworking based on the festival’s 70-year archives.

In 2016-17 concert season they focused on curating and producing the 2017 Cut and Splice Festival, which took place in Manchester for the first time since the festival's inception.

Distractfold has been able to invite numerous composers to join them in Manchester for performances at the International Anthony Burgess Foundation - such as Steven Kazuo Takasugi, Hanna Hartman, Weston Olencki, Marek Poliks, Sabrina Schroeder and Lori Freedman to name a few - and have given UK and world premieres of works from composers such as Pierluigi Billone, Santiago Díez-Fischer, Michelle Lou and Andrew Greenwald. Distractfold has also hosted guest performances from artists such as the Mivos Quartet, the Noise Upstairs, Wet Ink Ensemble and Lê Quan Ninh.

Alongside their work in Manchester, Distractfold perform regularly in festivals and concert series at home and abroad. Last season saw appearances at Bludenzer Tage Zeitgemäßer Musik in Austria where we presented two concerts including the world premiere of an evening-length piece by Sam Salem commissioned by the festival; Musica In Prossimità in Pinerolo, Italy; Global Adapter in Berlin and the New Music Manchester Festival in Manchester, UK.

Passionate about developing new ideas and creative potential among young composers, Distractfold has participated in reading sessions and workshops nationally and abroad. Some of these collaborative projects include workshops at Huddersfield University, Brunel University, Royal Northern College of Music and Ithaca College. In 2016 Distractfold was invited as one of the resident ensembles for the Harvard Group for New Music where they subsequently returned in 2018. In 2017 they were an ensemble in residence at Stanford University, CA. In Feb 2021 they will be in ‘virtual’ residence live from Manchester with composition students from Columbia University, NY.

www.distractfold.org.uk
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Thursday, February 16 2023 7:30 PM
Streaming:Click for stream  
CCRMA presents a live performance by Gabby Wen.

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FREE and Open to the Public

Livestream: ccrma.stanford.edu/live

Face coverings are strongly recommended. We encourage you to continue wearing masks for the comfort of our audience members, artists, and staff.

Directions, parking, accessibility: https://music.stanford.edu/venues-facilities/venues/ccrma-stage

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Gabby Wen is an artist who mainly works with sound in the form of improvisation and composition, focusing on the immediate corporal response to each sonic event, intentional or accidental, audible or inaudible, of its evolving/decaying physical existence and manifestation in time during playing. Born in Toisan, raised in Shenzhen, and living in Oakland, their works draw influences from early synthesizer music, Japanoise, folk music and rituals of various traditions, and naturally occurring or industrially induced polyrhythms. Gabby continues to develop a body of work combining synthesis, field recording, and guqin playing.
www.gabriellawen.com
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Thursday, February 23 2023 7:30 PM
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CCRMA presents a live performance by Abbie from Mars.

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FREE and Open to the Public

Face coverings are strongly recommended. We encourage you to continue wearing masks for the comfort of our audience members, artists, and staff.

Directions, parking, accessibility: https://music.stanford.edu/venues-facilities/venues/ccrma-stage

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Abbie is from Mars (PA). Now based in New York City, she makes and performs experimental pop music with a penchant for improvisation, noise, and performance art. Her act is unique for incorporating tap dance with live processing in Max/MSP between raw, impassioned, highly physical performances of her songs. A champion of the underground, Abbie is the host of RadioActivity, a weekly radio show at freeform station WFMU.

Abbie has performed across NYC venues and DIY spaces (Trans-Pecos, TV Eye, Union Pool, Rubulad, Purgatory, The Broadway, Wonderville, Windjammer, Chaos Computer) as well as at cultural institutions (Joe's Pub, a Program of the Public Theater; National Sawdust). She graduated in 2020 from Princeton University, where she studied History and Creative Writing and was a member of PLOrk (the Princeton Laptop Orchestra) and Program Director at WPRB.

www.abbiefrommars.com
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Friday, February 24 2023 7:30 PM
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CCRMA presents a live diffusion of the 16-channel work "Haïkus" by Annette Vande Gorne.

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FREE and Open to the Public

Face coverings are strongly recommended. We encourage you to continue wearing masks for the comfort of our audience members, artists, and staff.

Directions, parking, accessibility: https://music.stanford.edu/venues-facilities/venues/ccrma-stage

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Annette Vande Gorne studied music at the Royal Conservatories of Mons and Brussels, as well as the teachings of the composer Jean Absil. She discovered acousmatic music at a course in France and immediately realised, through the works of François Bayle and Pierre Henry, the potential within this art. She completed her training in musicology at the University of Brussels and in electroacoustic composition at the Paris Conservatory with Guy Reibel and Pierre Schaeffer.

Her models for an abstract, expressive language are nature and the physical world. Her music tackles different energy and kinaesthetic archetypes. Her research deals with the relationship to the word, in both sound and meaning, yet also on the notation of space. She has composed acousmatic music for the stage (Musiques pour Henri IV, 1980; Folie de Vincent, 1983; Action/Passion, 1987), for the radio (Bruxellesbivoque, 1997; Les écritures du son sur support, 2004), and for the concert: Tao, suite en 5 éléments, 1983-1991; Ce qu’a vu le vent d’Est, 2003; Figures d’espace, 2004; Yawar Fiesta, acousmatic opera, 2006-2012; Haiku, Printemps and Hiver, 2016-2017.

In Belgium she founded and directed Musiques & Recherches, the studio Métamorphoses d’Orphée and the acousmatic festival L’Espace du son, thanks to the formation of an acousmonium of 80 loudspeakers. She is also the editor of Lien, a periodical on musical æsthetics.
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Thursday, March 2 2023 7:30 PM
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CCRMA presents a live performance of "CONCUSSSSION" by Amma Ateria.

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FREE and Open to the Public

Face coverings are strongly recommended. We encourage you to continue wearing masks for the comfort of our audience members, artists, and staff.

Directions, parking, accessibility: https://music.stanford.edu/venues-facilities/venues/ccrma-stage

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'CONCUSSSSION' is an on-going sonic project that originates from an impact to the orbital and frontal bone. Sonic movements continue to develop over the course of my recovery since June 2021. Utilizing low-frequency binaural beats, brainwave entrainment, equal-loudness contour, and time shifts as focal point and sound palette. This work takes the forms of sound compositions, recordings, visual scores, performances, and time-based generated projections, as documents that track the changes of my neurological responses to DELTA, THETA, ALPHA, BETA, GAMMA waves. How does one’s process of recovery from trauma in the present moment shift the effects of past / present stress, oppression, dislocation, and collective trauma?

Amma Ateria is an electroacoustic composer and sound artist, born in Hong Kong, working in San Francisco and New York City. Her work explores themes in coexistence of polarity, psychoacoustics in binaural beats, and equal-loudness contour. With immediacy of tension / release, she navigates between oppositions, transforming deafening noise into meditative stance. Through cross-modal synesthetic influences from the contemporary moment, notions of externalizing resonances act in forms of questioning boundaries via the sonic spectrum. Her compositions, developed during concussion recovery utilizes brainwave entrainment, time shifts, and changes of neurological responses to DELTA, THETA, ALPHA, BETA, GAMMA waves as materials and focal point. With memories of condensed cities, she gravitates to frequencies of close-ranged airplanes, polyrhythmic occurrences, out-of-body experiences, sustained harmonics intersected with musique concrète, and distorted speech.

She studied with Maggi Payne and Fred Frith; Performed with Ikue Mori, Pauline Oliveros, Tarek Atoui, Paul Clipson, Zeena Parkins, Erik Friedlander, Brian Chase, Nava Dunkelman, Matmos, Pauchi Sasaki, John Zorn, Julie Tolentino, Stephanie Mei Huang, Kim Ip, and others; Performed as opening support for Franck Vigroux, Tim Hecker, Maggi Payne, and Carl Stone.

Since her studies at Mills College in music composition with specialization in electronic music, audio engineering, and media technology, her work has been presented in installation, performances, and artist-in-residence at SoART (2013 Austria), Titanik Gallery (2014 Finland), The Stone (2016 NYC), BAMPFA (2017 Berkeley), Exploratorium (2018 San Francisco), Marfa Sounding: Tarek Atoui (2018 Marfa), CCRMA @ Stanford University (2018), Cinematheque @ YBCA (2019), Minnesota Street Project (2019 San Francisco), Other Minds: Latitudes (2019 San Francisco), Recombinant 'Clouds of Confoundment’ (2020), Cone Shape Top: Cicada Series (2021), MAK Center/ Schindler House (2021), Fort Mason Arts & Culture (2021), Gray Area (2022 San Francisco), Pioneer Works (2022 NYC), San Francisco Electronic Music Festival (2022), Elsewhere Hall (2022 NYC), GAIDA Festival (2022 Lithuania).

www.ammaateria.com
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Friday, March 3 2023 7:30 PM
The Composition Forum presents the residency concert of Rajna Swaminathan, Ganavya Doraiswamy, and Myra Melford.

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FREE and Open to the Public

Face coverings are strongly recommended. We encourage you to continue wearing masks for the comfort of our audience members, artists, and staff.

Directions, parking, accessibility: https://music.stanford.edu/venues-facilities/venues/ccrma-stage

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Rajna Swaminathan is an acclaimed mrudangam artist, composer, and scholar. Rajna has been described as “a vital new voice” (Pop Matters), creating “music of gravity and rigor… yet its overall effect is accessible and uplifting” (Wall Street Journal). In her music and research, she explores the undercurrents of rhythmic experience and emergent textures in collective improvisation.

One of only a few women who play the mrudangam professionally, Rajna received her creative foundation on the instrument from her father, P.K. Swaminathan, and mrudangam legend Umayalpuram K. Sivaraman. Through extensive experience performing in the Karnatik music and bharatanatyam scenes, an affinity for various streams of South Asian film/popular music, and deep collaborative work in New York's jazz and creative music scene, Rajna developed experimental approaches to improvising on the mrudangam, piano, and voice.

Rajna’s orientation as an improviser-composer blossomed through a search for resonance and fluidity among musical forms and aesthetic worlds. Her ensemble RAJAS has been a prominent medium for her expansive compositions, which involve a lattice of rhythmic, textural, and modal approaches. The ensemble's sound has been described as “unlike any other on the scene” (New York Times), and their debut album, Of Agency and Abstraction (Biophilia Records, 2019), received much critical acclaim. The ensemble recently premiered and began touring a new suite, Apertures, commissioned and supported by Chamber Music America's New Jazz Works program (2019-2022).

Rajna’s scholarly work also intersects with her musical study and informs her creative curiosities. She was recently appointed as Assistant Professor of Music (Integrated Composition, Improvisation, and Technology) at UC Irvine's Claire Trevor School of the Arts. She holds a PhD in Music (Creative Practice and Critical Inquiry) from Harvard University, and degrees in Anthropology and French from the University of Maryland, College Park. Her dissertation, titled Time, Virtuosity, and Ethics Otherwise: Queer Resonances for Diasporic Play, catalyzes a creative dialogue between artistic and academic engagements with uncertainty and openness in geography, archive, and embodiment.

In addition to her work with RAJAS, Rajna has composed for JACK Quartet, Del Sol Quartet, violinists Jennifer Koh and Lucia Lin, among others. Recent commissions include the Los Angeles Philharmonic, National Sawdust, Bang On A Can Marathon, and fellowships with the Gabriela Lena Frank Creative Academy of Music. Rajna performs extensively in ensembles led by Vijay Iyer, Amir ElSaffar, Ganavya Doraiswamy, and Aakash Mittal. Her interdisciplinary work has included collaborations with playwright Anu Yadav, visual artist Zahyr Lauren, the Ragamala Dance Company, and poets Mahogany L. Browne, Sarah Kay, and Jon Sands.

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Tamil Nadu-raised and New York-born critically acclaimed vocalist Ganavya Doraiswamy lives, learns, and loves fluidly from the nexus of many frameworks and understandings. Hers is a deeply profound and rooted voice. A multidisciplinary creator, she is a soundsmith and wordsmith. Trained as an improviser, scholar, dancer, and multi-instrumentalist, she maintains an inner library of “spi/ritual” blueprints offered to her by an intergenerational constellation of collaborators, continuously anchoring her practice in pasts, presents and, futures. Much of her childhood was on the pilgrimage trail, learning the storytelling art form of harikathā and singing poetry that critiques hierarchal social structures. She is a co-founder of the non-hierarchical We Have Voice Collective.

Hers is a life of nonlinearity, and singularity. Despite not not being schooled traditionally as a child, she carries degrees in theatre (Broward Community College) and psychology (F.I.U.), with graduate degrees in Contemporary Performance (Berklee College of Music), ethnomusicology (UCLA), and Creative Practice and Critical Inquiry (Harvard). Both as an educator and student, she “wishes to study and bring liberative techniques into this world… study certain dyads: what empowers, who is disempowered; what heals, who is ailing— and wishes to wed the two.”

Recent works include: a film made during the pandamic titled this body is so impermanent... (2021) directed by her close collaborator Polar Music Awardee Peter Sellars, featuring Ganavya (composition, solo voice), legendary calligrapher Wang Dongling, and acclaimed dancer Michael Schumacher (choreography, dance). The piece was created over a 6-month intensive collaborative period, where Ganavya worked from the rural mountains of Oregon, Michael from Amsterdam, Peter from LA, and Wang Dongling from China. Additional works include: 64-hour piece titled Atlas Unlimited: Acts VII - X (2019) where she continuously generated material from the narrative of Zakaria Almoutlak, a Syrian with refugee status; Daughter of a Temple (2019) a 56’51” composed piece for two loudspeakers that drew from Alice Coltrane-Turiyasangitananda’s Monument Eternal, as premiered in the 13th Havana Biennial for Carrie Mae Weems’s The Spirit That Resides; Vimalakirti Nirdesa Sutra Chapter 7: The Goddess (2019) directed by Peter Sellars, featuring Ganavya (composition, solo voice) and Michael Schumacher (choreography, dance). Her written work includes a collection of 101 short essays titled ether, will appear in the forthcoming issue of Arcana: Musicians on Music, edited by John Zorn.

Selected forthcoming works include words for Wayne Shorter and Esperanza Spalding's forthcoming opera Iphigenia; leading How To Cure A Ghost: The Album, songs made from Fariha Roisin’s poetry; Sister Idea, an album made on WhatsApp with bassist and composer Munir Hossn, and Let’s Go Out and Play, commissioned by the Jerome Foundation for Roulette Intermedium.

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The pianist, composer, bandleader and educator Myra Melford— whom the New Yorker called “a stalwart of the new-jazz movement”—has spent the last three decades making brilliant original music that is equally challenging and engaging. Culling inspiration from a wide range of sources including Cecil Taylor, the blues and boogie-woogie of her native Chicago, the poetry of Rumi, the AACM and yoga, she’s explored an array of formats, among them ruminative solo-piano recitals, deeply interactive combos and ambitious multidisciplinary programs. Melford’s most recent release, The Other Side of Air (Firehouse 12), by her quintet Snowy Egret, is an extraordinary document of her unique creative language—a seamless, shifting blend of composition and improvisation, and a probing of the space shared between dynamic small-group jazz and contemporary chamber music. Since debuting on record as a bandleader in 1990, she’s built a discography of more than 20 albums as a leader or co-leader, and has collaborated with such luminaries as Dave Douglas, Marty Ehrlich, Liberty Ellman, Erik Friedlander, Ben Goldberg, Joseph Jarman, Leroy Jenkins, Ron Miles, Nicole Mitchell, Tyshawn Sorey, Chris Speed, Stomu Takeishi, Cuong Vu and the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra.
Melford’s teachers and mentors include Butch Morris, Henry Threadgill, Jaki Byard, Don Pullen and other icons of jazz postmodernism, and she has received some of the most prestigious honors available to an improvising musician: numerous DownBeat poll placings, a 2000 Fulbright scholarship, a 2012 Alpert Award in the Arts for Music and, in 2013, a Guggenheim Fellowship, the Doris Duke Performing Artist Award and the Doris Duke Residency to Build Demand for the Arts.
After having been an influential presence in New York since the mid-’80s, Melford relocated to the Bay Area in 2004, to join the music department at the University of California, Berkeley, as a Professor of Composition and Improvisational Practices. She continues to bring cutting-edge jazz and new music to the campus community via her teaching and as a guest curator for the Cal Performances organization.
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Thursday, March 16 2023 7:30 PM
Streaming:Click for stream  
CCRMA presents a concert of spatial audio and audiovisual works by Jay Afrisando.

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FREE and Open to the Public

Face coverings are strongly recommended. We encourage you to continue wearing masks for the comfort of our audience members, artists, and staff.

Directions, parking, accessibility: https://music.stanford.edu/venues-facilities/venues/ccrma-stage

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Employing multisensory approaches (aural, visual, tactile, and imagination), Jay Afrisando raises awareness of aural diversity, acoustic ecology, and cultural identity. His works invite others to (re)examine our notions of living and non-living entities, ecosystems, and technology. He shares vital experiences and disseminates knowledge through various means, including video, spatial audio, fixed media, improvisation, and various collaborative methods.
His works have been presented at Sound Scene, Walker Art Center’s Virtual Cinema, ARGOS Projector: The Faraway Nearby, MOXsonic, Sonic Salon Winter, In Situ: Festival for Electronic Music and Sound Art, Aural Diversity Conference, October Meeting Contemporary Music & Musicians, Seoul International Computer Music Conference, International Computer Music Conference-New York City Electroacoustic Music Festival, Landmark to Lowertown, Linux Audio Conference, Disability Awareness Week, Drone Not Drones, and Fifteen Minutes of Fame.

His works have been presented at various spaces, including Smithsonian Hirshhorn National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Moon Palace Books, Attenborough Arts Centre, Fridman Gallery, George Latimer Public Library, Saint Paul Union Depot, Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics, Cedar Cultural Center, Seattle Art Museum, Montalvo Arts Center, and National Gugak Center.

He has collaborated/worked with composers, instrumentalists, a signer, vocalists, visual artists, choreographers, dancers, writers, mobile app programmers, sound engineers, an actor, stage directors, videographers, researchers, and viewers-audiences, including Bill Davies, Josephine Dickinson, Ed Garland, Alan Jacques, Jamil Haque, Gelsey Bell, J-Sun, Yan Pang, Arif Angga, Lee Noble, Black Pencil Ensemble, Duo Gelland, Gamelan Kyai Fatahillah, Katie Kummerow, Michael Duffy, Alex Lubet, Mondo Gascaro, Katya Shilonosova, Ng Chor Guan, Daniel de Mendoza, Terry Perdanawati, MN Qomaruddin, Banu Antoro, Gading Paksi, Ere Lievonen, Arend Grosfeld, Anne Veinberg, Slamet Gundono, Dewa Budjana, gamin, Djaduk Ferianto, Purwanto, Jen Shyu, Jemek Supardi, and Cedric Hanriot.

He is a Jerome Hill Artist Fellow 2021-22 (US); a grantee of the Next Step Fund 2020 by the Metropolitan Regional Arts Council (US); the recipient of the ABT Award 2020 by the Art Music Today (ID), Black Pencil Ensemble (NL), and Trace21 (NL); and a OneBeat Fellow 2015. He also received the Ambassador's Award for Excellence 2019 from the Ambassador of the Republic of Indonesia for the United States (US), the 2016 Minnesota Emerging Composer Award from the American Composers Forum (US), Hibah Seni Karya Inovatif (Innovative Art Grant) 2016 from Yayasan Kelola (ID), and the 2nd Prize Winner of Prix Annelie de Man 2015 Composers Competition from Stichting Annelie de Man (NL).

He participated in the Improvising Ecosystem 2017 at the Hubachek Wilderness Research Center (MN, US); the OneBeat 2015 residency in California, Oregon, and Washington (US); the 2014 International Fellowship in Study of Korean Music at National Gugak Center (KR); and the Hackteria Lab/Akustikologi 2014 at Bumi Pemuda Rahayu Sustainability Center (ID).

He is the initiator and a collaborator at Jay & Gatra Wardaya, a group focusing on text-based and contemporary music. He is also a collaborator at TIGAtrio, a trans-continent improvisation group. In addition, he is a collaborator of CHANT, collaborative research by researchers of the University of Minnesota, Ohio State University, and the University of Louisiana Monroe, centering on the nexus of culture, healing, art, nature, and technology.

His publication includes a book chapter “Music-Making in Aurally Diverse Communities” in Aural Diversity (Routledge, 2022), telematic improvisational film Expanding the Frame Live in collaboration with Lee Noble (Walker Art Center’s Bentson Mediatheque, 2021), soundscape album Rangkaian Pagi untuk Dikenang (2021), score for one-hand piano “Tangguh” (2021), track “Gunung Singgalang” in Alex Lubet’s solo album Three Strings and the Truth: New Music for Mountain Dulcimer (pfMENTUM, 2020), and graphic score “Water Siter” (Donemus, 2015).

He is currently practicing and conducting most of his activities in Mnisóta Makhóčhe, the land of the Dakhóta Oyáte, also known as Minnesota.

www.jayafrisando.com
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News:
05/20/2017

July 10-14
CCRMA Summer Workshop
Stanford University, CA
https://ccrma.stanford.edu/workshops/eae-2017

Electronic Arts Ensemble is designed for musicians, visual artists, programmers, designers, writers, dancers, actors, or artists of any discipline to collaboratively develop improvisatory performances using custom digital toolkits. 
 
The workshop will address topics including:
performance practices, with a focus on improvisation
music performance software (Max/MSP, Max4Live, Ableton Live, etc.)
video performance software (Jitter, Premiere Pro, After Effects, etc.)
hardware and sensors (Arduino, Kinect, MIDI controllers, etc.)
networked performance (OSC, JackTrip, etc.)


The schedule includes lectures, demos, discussions, and lab time. At the core of the workshop, daily group improvisations using customized toolkits will enable participants to develop a novel approach to their individual artistic practice. Participants are encouraged to experiment with the technology presented during the demos, and to engage with their peers in synergetic creation. The multidisciplinary ensemble will stage a public performance on the last day of the workshop.
 
Participants should either have an established artistic discipline, or have experience with programming and digital media. Both would be ideal, but not required. It is recommended that participants bring their own laptops and instruments, cameras, projectors, or other electronic gear.

About the instructors
 
Alex Chechile is an artist and composer whose work develops in parallel with research in neuroscience, psychoacoustics, and the biomechanics of hearing. His electroacoustic compositions and installations bring transparency to otherwise invisible processes in biology and technology. His work has been shown across the United States, Europe, and Asia. His projects have been supported by The New York State Council on the Arts (NYSCA), Harvestworks (NYC), Issue Project Room (NYC), the Experimental Television Center (NY), the Deep Listening Institute (NY), and the American Embassy. His work has been presented at MoMA, The 2011 New York Electronic Arts Festival, and SIGGRAPH San Diego. Alex performs in the SideLObe chamber laptop ensemble with Ge Wang, was a founding member of Pauline Oliveros' Tintinnabulate ensemble, collaborated with Mercury Rev, and opened for Primus. Chechile is a Ph.D. candidate at Stanford University’s Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA), and holds an MFA in Electronic Art from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and a BA in Music from Tufts University.
 
Constantin Basica is a Romanian composer living in the San Francisco Bay Area, whose current work explores perceptual illusions in the context of audiovisual performance. His compositions include pieces for solo instruments, chamber ensembles, orchestra, and opera. In recent years, he has been composing multimedia works for acoustic instruments, electronics, and video, which have been performed in Europe and in the United States by artists such as Séverine Ballon, Tony Arnold, Elision Ensemble, Ensemble Dal Niente, Ensemble Liminar, JACK Quartet, and Spektral Quartet. Constantin is the Alice Wilber Chapman graduate fellow at Stanford University, where he is working toward a D.M.A. in Composition. He received an M.A. degree in Multimedia Composition from the University of Music and Theater Hamburg, Germany, and two B.A. degrees in Composition and Conducting from the National University of Music Bucharest, Romania. As a teaching assistant at Stanford University, Constantin received the Chair’s Award for Excellence in Teaching in 2015. He was also one of the lecturers at the 2016 Sound and Music Computing Conference and Summer School in Hamburg, Germany.