Serving the San Francisco Bay Area New Music Community

                 
CCRMA
660 Lomita Dr.
Stanford CA 94305  

The Stanford Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA) is a multi-disciplinary facility where composers and researchers work together using computer-based technology both as an artistic medium and as a research tool.

Pronouncing "CCRMA":
CCRMA is an acronym for the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics it is pronounced "karma" (the first "c" is silent).

Areas of ongoing interest:
Composition, Applications Hardware, Applications Software, Synthesis Techniques and Algorithms, Physical Modeling, Music and Mobile Devices, Sensors, Real-Time Controllers, Signal Processing, Digital Recording and Editing, Psychoacoustics and Musical Acoustics, Perceptual Audio Coding, Music Information Retrieval, Audio Networking, Auditory Display of Multidimensional Data (Data Sonification), and Real-Time Applications.

The CCRMA community:
Administrative and technical staff, faculty, research associates, graduate research assistants, graduate and undergraduate students, visiting scholars, visiting researchers and composers, and industrial associates. Departments actively represented at CCRMA include Music, Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Computer Science, Physics, Art, Drama, and Psychology.

Center activities:
Academic courses, seminars, small interest group meetings, summer workshops and colloquia. Concerts of computer music are presented several times each year, including exchange concerts with area computer music centers. In-house technical reports and recordings are available, and public demonstrations of ongoing work at CCRMA are held periodically.

Research results:
Are published and presented at professional meetings, international conferences and in established journals including the Computer Music Journal, Journal of the Audio Engineering Society, the Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, and various transactions of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE). Compositions are presented in new music festivals and radio broadcasts throughout the world and have been recorded on cassette, LP, and compact disk.

CCRMA affiliation:
The Center for Computer Assisted Research in the Humanities (CCARH), also located at Stanford. CCARH conducts research on constructing computer databases for music, and on creating programs that allow researchers to access, analyze, print, and electronically perform the music. This focus is complementary to research at CCRMA in several ways.

Support for CCRMA:
The late Doreen B. Townsend, Walter Hewlett, the California Arts Council, the Ann and Gordon Getty Foundation, the Mellon Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Science Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation (for artists-in-residence), the System Development Foundation, Apple Computer, ATR Human Information Processing Research Labs, Aureal Semiconductor, Bio Control, Crystal Semiconductor, Digidesign, Dynacord, E-mu, Fast Mathematical Algorithms and Hardware, Fender Musical Instruments Corporation, Hewlett Packard, IBM Computer Music Center, Interval Research, ITRI CCL Taiwan, Kind of Loud Technologies, Korg, Matsushita, Media Vision, McDSP, NEC, NeXT Computer, Nokia Group, NTT Communication Science Laboratories, Opcode Systems, Philips Semiconductors, Rockwell International, Roland, Sony, Symbolics, Texas Instruments, Universal Audio/Kind of Loud Technologies, Xerox Palo Alto Research Center, Yamaha, Young Chang R&D Institute, Zeta Music Partners, and private gifts.
https://ccrma.stanford.edu/

Upcoming Events:
Friday, June 3 2022 7:30 PM
Streaming:Click for stream  
CCRMA presents a live performance by Joel St. Julien.

Free and Open to the Public

Registration is required for in-person attendance in the CCRMA Stage: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/joel-st-julien-tickets-346861832077

Live streaming at CCRMA LIVE: https://ccrma.stanford.edu/live

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Face coverings are strongly recommended. We encourage you to continue wearing masks for the comfort of our audience members, artists, and staff.

For more information please visit CCRMA's COVID-19 Policies (ccrma.stanford.edu/docs/common/COVID-policies.html) and the COVID-19 safety protocols for Department of Music events (music.stanford.edu/covid19safety).
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Joel St. Julien (b. 1980) is a Haitian-American composer, musician, songwriter, and sound artist based in San Francisco. Joel has written music for documentaries, short / feature films, podcasts, and dance. He is a firm believer in experimentation/fusion with acoustic and electronic elements in sound oscillating through escapism and the mysticism of the present tense.

Joel has shared music at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, the San Francisco Electronic Music Festival, Salesforce Tower, Gray Area, CounterPulse Festival, Land and Sea Gallery, Spectrum NYC, Frameline, Mill Valley Film Festival, and PBS. His music has also been featured and reviewed in Resident Advisor, The Wire, KQED, Foxy Digitalis, a closer listen, Fault Radio, Dublab, and many more. Chosen as one of KQED's 10 Best Bay Area Albums of 2021, his latest release, EMPATHY, is available at joelstjulien.bandcamp.com.

http://www.joelstjulien.com
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Sunday, June 5 2022 4:00 PM
This concert will be a ritual. It will happen in a place that is dear to me, a place with acoustics both comforting and overwhelming. I’ve been visiting this place for years. It has taken care of me and for that I am grateful. I will be singing to this place and to you, us, me—my body—this transgendered body still recovering from covid and heartbreak. I will be accompanied by live electronics. My songs and extended vocal improvisations draw from the pagan oral tradition of regilaul. They are incantations and lullabies; simple songs sung to hold rage and transmute communal exhaustion. This is folk music in as much as I sing it to lessen the pain of living.

Come. Let us lose ourselves together in this place. And maybe find one another; in the land, in feeling, and in listening.

—Vaim Sarv

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Registration is required: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/vaim-sarv-tickets-318645897457

The event will take place in a secret location. Details will be released two weeks prior via email.
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Vaim Sarv is an Estonian folk musician and experimental vocalist. She combines pagan oral tradition with live electronics and extended vocal technique. His practice centers deep relationships to ritual spaces with unconventional acoustics and queer senses of place.

https://www.vaim.net
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Thursday, June 9 2022 7:30 PM
Streaming:Click for stream  
CCRMA composer, performer, lecturer, and computer systems administrator Fernando Lopez-Lezcano performs "The Love Songs of Flying Dinosaurs" on his Applesauce Modular Mark V synthesizer.

Free and Open to the Public

Registration is required for in-person attendance in the CCRMA Stage: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/fernando-lopez-lezcano-tickets-318642467197

Live streaming at CCRMA LIVE: https://ccrma.stanford.edu/live

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Face coverings are strongly recommended. We encourage you to continue wearing masks for the comfort of our audience members, artists, and staff.

For more information please visit CCRMA's COVID-19 Policies (ccrma.stanford.edu/docs/common/COVID-policies.html) and the COVID-19 safety protocols for Department of Music events (music.stanford.edu/covid19safety).
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Fernando Lopez-Lezcano enjoys imagining and building things, fixing them when they don't work, and improving them even if they seem to work just fine. The scope of the word "things" is very wide, and includes computer hardware and software, controllers, music composition, performance and sound. His music blurs the line between technology and art, and is as much about form and sound processing, synthesis and spatialization, as about algorithms and custom software he writes for each piece. He has been working in multichannel sound and diffusion techniques for a long time, and can hack Linux for a living. At CCRMA, Stanford University since 1993, he combines his backgrounds in music (piano and composition), electronic engineering and programming with his love of teaching and music composition and performance. He discovered the intimate workings of sound while building his own analog synthesizers a very very long time ago, and even after more than 30 years, "El Dinosaurio" is still being used in live performances. He was the Edgar Varese Guest Professor at TU Berlin during the Summer of 2008. In 2014 he received the Marsh O'Neill Award For Exceptional and Enduring Support of Stanford University's Research Enterprise.

http://ccrma.stanford.edu/~nando/index.shtml
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Friday, June 10 2022 6:00 PM
Streaming:Click for stream  
Join us for a musical showcase with CCRMA artists Elena Sword (Junior BA/MST), Joudi Nox (MA/MST 2022), and Madame Gandhi (MA/MST 2022) as the Spring Quarter comes to a close.

Free and Open to the Public

Registration is required for in-person attendance in the CCRMA Courtyard: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/madame-gandhi-opening-elena-s-and-joudi-nox-tickets-318648796127

Live streaming at CCRMA LIVE: https://ccrma.stanford.edu/live

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6:15-6:30pm: Elena Sword
6:40-7:05pm: Joudi Nox
7:15-8:00pm: Madame Gandhi

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Madame Gandhi is an LA-based artist and activist known for her uplifting, percussive electronic music and positive message about gender liberation and personal power. She began producing music in 2015, after her story running the London Marathon free-bleeding to combat menstrual stigma went viral around the world. She has been listed as Forbes 30 Under 30 in Music, and her 2020 TED Talk about conscious music consumption has been viewed over a million times. “Waiting For Me,” shot in Mumbai, India, won the Music Video Jury Award at SXSW Film Festival in 2021 and her seasonal merch drops have been featured in fashion outlets like The New York Times, Vogue and GQ India. Her third studio album, Vibrations, is slated for release in 2022, following the release of her previous albums Voices (2016) and Visions (2019).
(Photo credit: Bret Hartman)
https://www.madamegandhi.com/

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Joudi Nox is a singer songwriter who writes in detail everything in her life. She loves storytelling lyrics that you could either relate to or enjoy learning about. So be aware of the lyrics and what they could mean, but also enjoy the music.

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Elena Stalnaker (artist name: Elena Sword, pronouns: she/her) is a "super-junior" (formerly class of '22, now '23) from Bloomington, Indiana, majoring in Music, Science, and Technology. She is involved with opera and musical theater singing on campus and is a member of the Stanford Chamber Chorale. She has been songwriting for 4 years and learning to record and produce while at CCRMA. She is currently working on a concept album about her experiences living with chronic illness, which she has gotten a Major Grant to finish over the summer. Find her on SoundCloud and Spotify as Elena Sword!
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News:
05/20/2017

July 10-14
CCRMA Summer Workshop
Stanford University, CA
https://ccrma.stanford.edu/workshops/eae-2017

Electronic Arts Ensemble is designed for musicians, visual artists, programmers, designers, writers, dancers, actors, or artists of any discipline to collaboratively develop improvisatory performances using custom digital toolkits. 
 
The workshop will address topics including:
performance practices, with a focus on improvisation
music performance software (Max/MSP, Max4Live, Ableton Live, etc.)
video performance software (Jitter, Premiere Pro, After Effects, etc.)
hardware and sensors (Arduino, Kinect, MIDI controllers, etc.)
networked performance (OSC, JackTrip, etc.)


The schedule includes lectures, demos, discussions, and lab time. At the core of the workshop, daily group improvisations using customized toolkits will enable participants to develop a novel approach to their individual artistic practice. Participants are encouraged to experiment with the technology presented during the demos, and to engage with their peers in synergetic creation. The multidisciplinary ensemble will stage a public performance on the last day of the workshop.
 
Participants should either have an established artistic discipline, or have experience with programming and digital media. Both would be ideal, but not required. It is recommended that participants bring their own laptops and instruments, cameras, projectors, or other electronic gear.

About the instructors
 
Alex Chechile is an artist and composer whose work develops in parallel with research in neuroscience, psychoacoustics, and the biomechanics of hearing. His electroacoustic compositions and installations bring transparency to otherwise invisible processes in biology and technology. His work has been shown across the United States, Europe, and Asia. His projects have been supported by The New York State Council on the Arts (NYSCA), Harvestworks (NYC), Issue Project Room (NYC), the Experimental Television Center (NY), the Deep Listening Institute (NY), and the American Embassy. His work has been presented at MoMA, The 2011 New York Electronic Arts Festival, and SIGGRAPH San Diego. Alex performs in the SideLObe chamber laptop ensemble with Ge Wang, was a founding member of Pauline Oliveros' Tintinnabulate ensemble, collaborated with Mercury Rev, and opened for Primus. Chechile is a Ph.D. candidate at Stanford University’s Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA), and holds an MFA in Electronic Art from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and a BA in Music from Tufts University.
 
Constantin Basica is a Romanian composer living in the San Francisco Bay Area, whose current work explores perceptual illusions in the context of audiovisual performance. His compositions include pieces for solo instruments, chamber ensembles, orchestra, and opera. In recent years, he has been composing multimedia works for acoustic instruments, electronics, and video, which have been performed in Europe and in the United States by artists such as Séverine Ballon, Tony Arnold, Elision Ensemble, Ensemble Dal Niente, Ensemble Liminar, JACK Quartet, and Spektral Quartet. Constantin is the Alice Wilber Chapman graduate fellow at Stanford University, where he is working toward a D.M.A. in Composition. He received an M.A. degree in Multimedia Composition from the University of Music and Theater Hamburg, Germany, and two B.A. degrees in Composition and Conducting from the National University of Music Bucharest, Romania. As a teaching assistant at Stanford University, Constantin received the Chair’s Award for Excellence in Teaching in 2015. He was also one of the lecturers at the 2016 Sound and Music Computing Conference and Summer School in Hamburg, Germany.