Serving the San Francisco Bay Area New Music Community

                 
CCRMA
660 Lomita Dr.
Stanford CA 94305  

The Stanford Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA) is a multi-disciplinary facility where composers and researchers work together using computer-based technology both as an artistic medium and as a research tool.

Pronouncing "CCRMA":
CCRMA is an acronym for the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics it is pronounced "karma" (the first "c" is silent).

Areas of ongoing interest:
Composition, Applications Hardware, Applications Software, Synthesis Techniques and Algorithms, Physical Modeling, Music and Mobile Devices, Sensors, Real-Time Controllers, Signal Processing, Digital Recording and Editing, Psychoacoustics and Musical Acoustics, Perceptual Audio Coding, Music Information Retrieval, Audio Networking, Auditory Display of Multidimensional Data (Data Sonification), and Real-Time Applications.

The CCRMA community:
Administrative and technical staff, faculty, research associates, graduate research assistants, graduate and undergraduate students, visiting scholars, visiting researchers and composers, and industrial associates. Departments actively represented at CCRMA include Music, Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Computer Science, Physics, Art, Drama, and Psychology.

Center activities:
Academic courses, seminars, small interest group meetings, summer workshops and colloquia. Concerts of computer music are presented several times each year, including exchange concerts with area computer music centers. In-house technical reports and recordings are available, and public demonstrations of ongoing work at CCRMA are held periodically.

Research results:
Are published and presented at professional meetings, international conferences and in established journals including the Computer Music Journal, Journal of the Audio Engineering Society, the Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, and various transactions of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE). Compositions are presented in new music festivals and radio broadcasts throughout the world and have been recorded on cassette, LP, and compact disk.

CCRMA affiliation:
The Center for Computer Assisted Research in the Humanities (CCARH), also located at Stanford. CCARH conducts research on constructing computer databases for music, and on creating programs that allow researchers to access, analyze, print, and electronically perform the music. This focus is complementary to research at CCRMA in several ways.

Support for CCRMA:
The late Doreen B. Townsend, Walter Hewlett, the California Arts Council, the Ann and Gordon Getty Foundation, the Mellon Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Science Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation (for artists-in-residence), the System Development Foundation, Apple Computer, ATR Human Information Processing Research Labs, Aureal Semiconductor, Bio Control, Crystal Semiconductor, Digidesign, Dynacord, E-mu, Fast Mathematical Algorithms and Hardware, Fender Musical Instruments Corporation, Hewlett Packard, IBM Computer Music Center, Interval Research, ITRI CCL Taiwan, Kind of Loud Technologies, Korg, Matsushita, Media Vision, McDSP, NEC, NeXT Computer, Nokia Group, NTT Communication Science Laboratories, Opcode Systems, Philips Semiconductors, Rockwell International, Roland, Sony, Symbolics, Texas Instruments, Universal Audio/Kind of Loud Technologies, Xerox Palo Alto Research Center, Yamaha, Young Chang R&D Institute, Zeta Music Partners, and private gifts.
https://ccrma.stanford.edu/

Upcoming Events:
Sunday, March 24 2019 6:00 PM
After seven years outside of the United States, Linux Audio Conference (LAC) is coming back to Stanford University on March 23-26, 2019 for its 17th edition! LAC is the international conference about Free/Open-Source Software for music, sound, and other media with GNU/Linux as the main platform. Electroacoustic music and multimedia performances by participants at the conference will be presented in five concerts:
Concert 1: Sat, Mar 23, 6:00-7:00 PM | CCRMA Stage
Concert 2: Sat, Mar 23, 8:00-9:00 PM | CCRMA Stage
Concert 3: Sun, Mar 24, 6:00-7:00 PM | CCRMA Stage
Concert 4: Sun, Mar 24, 8:00-9:00 PM | CCRMA Stage
Concert 5: Mon, Mar 25, 8:00-10:00 PM | CCRMA Courtyard (or, if it rains, Braun Rehearsal Hall in the Braun Music Center)

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Program for Concert 3:
Remmy Canedo
Massimo Fragalà
Christopher Jette
Bruno Ruviaro / Dustin Donahue / Janice Edgerly-Rooks
Stevie Sutanto  More...

Sunday, March 24 2019 8:00 PM
After seven years outside of the United States, Linux Audio Conference (LAC) is coming back to Stanford University on March 23-26, 2019 for its 17th edition! LAC is the international conference about Free/Open-Source Software for music, sound, and other media with GNU/Linux as the main platform. Electroacoustic music and multimedia performances by participants at the conference will be presented in five concerts:
Concert 1: Sat, Mar 23, 6:00-7:00 PM | CCRMA Stage
Concert 2: Sat, Mar 23, 8:00-9:00 PM | CCRMA Stage
Concert 3: Sun, Mar 24, 6:00-7:00 PM | CCRMA Stage
Concert 4: Sun, Mar 24, 8:00-9:00 PM | CCRMA Stage
Concert 5: Mon, Mar 25, 8:00-10:00 PM | CCRMA Courtyard (or, if it rains, Braun Rehearsal Hall in the Braun Music Center)

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Program for Concert 4:
Ainolnaim Azizol
Fernando Lopez-Lezcano
Michal Seta
Ryo Yumoto / Kenta Tanaka / Reo Anzai / Makoto Amano / Shoya Maruyama  More...

Monday, March 25 2019 8:00 PM
After seven years outside of the United States, Linux Audio Conference (LAC) is coming back to Stanford University on March 23-26, 2019 for its 17th edition! LAC is the international conference about Free/Open-Source Software for music, sound, and other media with GNU/Linux as the main platform. Electroacoustic music and multimedia performances by participants at the conference will be presented in five concerts:
Concert 1: Sat, Mar 23, 6:00-7:00 PM | CCRMA Stage
Concert 2: Sat, Mar 23, 8:00-9:00 PM | CCRMA Stage
Concert 3: Sun, Mar 24, 6:00-7:00 PM | CCRMA Stage
Concert 4: Sun, Mar 24, 8:00-9:00 PM | CCRMA Stage
Concert 5: Mon, Mar 25, 8:00-10:00 PM | CCRMA Courtyard (or, if it rains, Braun Rehearsal Hall in the Braun Music Center)

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Program for Concert 5 "Club Night":
Aitor Arronte
RGGTRN (Luis N. del Angel, Emilio Ocelotl, Marianne Teixido, Jessica A. Rodríguez)
David Runge
Mayank Sanganeria  More...

Wednesday, March 27 2019 7:30 PM
"Barrier, Stop for inspection" was commissioned for the 2018 Warsaw Autumn Festival, and employs sounds, texts and images. The text, about the activity of remembering, was written in June 2018, and was translated to Polish by Halina Cieplińska. It appears both in English and in Polish orally and visually in fixed times during the piece. Most other materials, musical and visual, are performed and controlled during the live performance.

A memory that I create right now.

In fact right now, there are two “right nows”.

Mine when I am typing these words, and yours (possibly in the future) when you are reading them,

Possibly, we may agree that you are there (in time and space) and I am here at a linked “right-now.”

A mutual agreement on an uncertain truth.

— Amnon Wolman, 2018

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Wed, Mar 27, 7:30pm
CCRMA Stage, The Knoll
FREE and Open to the Public
ccrma.stanford.edu/about/directions
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Amnon Wolman is a sound artist and composer who pursues a sound world in which social interactions are part of the musical information, and of the creative process. He is interested in the peculiar and subjective listening of an individual. and not with the generalizations that all listeners are presented with. His work is presented by various soloists, performance organizations, galleries, and museums. Publications of some of his audio and text works are available commercially and on the web. He currently teaches at the Jerusalem Academy of Music and Dance and lives with his partner Eyal Levinson in Kfar Vradim, Israel, doing his best to support a just solution for the Palestinians living under Israeli rule.

http://amnonwolman.org  More...

Friday, March 29 2019 7:30 PM
sounds from behind the (absent) walls

Ostap Manulyak presents a program of works by contemporary Ukrainian composers and asks a question about real/imaginative/forgotten walls: Do they (still) mark our internal and external space?



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Fri, Mar 29, 7:30pm
CCRMA Stage, The Knoll
FREE and Open to the Public
ccrma.stanford.edu/about/directions
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Ostap Manulyak, born 1983 in Lviv, is an Ukrainian composer, performer and organiser of different artistic initiatives. He is a Ph.D. and docent (assist. prof.) in the Composition Department of the Lviv Music Academy. Manulyak studied composition at the Lviv Music Academy (with prof. Viktor Kaminsky) and also took part in many master-classes of new music leaded by such composers as: Samuel Andreyev (Canada), Carola Bauckholt (Germany), Stefano Gervasoni (Italy), Sergej Newski (Russia-Germany), Serhiy Pilyutikov (Ukraine), Boguslaw Schäffer (Poland), Gerhard Stäbler (Germany) and others. In 2009, he received the LODA and Ukrainian Academy of Science Award and in 2010 the Levko Revutsky award in composition. Manulyak was a fellow of Gaude Polonia Program twice. In 2006, he studied composition at the Krakow Music Academy with prof. Zbigniew Bujarski. In 2011, he worked at the Studio of Electroacoustic Music (SME) at Krakow Music Academy and studied electroacoustic music with prof. Marek Choloniewski. Ostap Manulyak is a co-founder of Art Association NURT, director of the Festival of electroacoustic music VOX ELECTRONICA and Experimental Educational Studio of Electroacoustic Music (EESEM) of Lviv Music Academy. Currently, he is visiting the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustic (CCRMA) of Stanford University (California) as Fulbright fellow.  More...

Thursday, April 25 2019 7:30 PM
Dafna Naphtali and Hans Tammen present two individual performances: "Audio Chandelier" (Naphtali) and "Endangered Guitar" (Tammen).




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Thu, Apr 25, 7:30pm
CCRMA Stage, The Knoll
FREE and Open to the Public
ccrma.stanford.edu/about/directions
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DAFNA NAPHTALI - AUDIO CHANDELIER: GEARS, OUTTAKES, FRY

Individual grains of nearly static sound dispersed to 8-16 speakers and altered as granular synthesis illuminates and refracts moments in time. In each of this set of three pieces, field recordings and audio samples and live vocals are processed as one “grain” is sent to each speaker available. By manipulating the grains of sound (which remain static in each speaker) a surprising array of sounds and environments are created — from shimmering motion to reverberant spaces, to low crashing waves, to hyper-electronics refraction of sound, layered with additional audio using “SpeakerKeys” a MIDI keyboard-controlled routing of sounds as “notes”, one note per speaker so the speakers can be played as large group of individual sounding instruments. Audio Chandelier is a collection of pieces that have been presented since 2008 as multi-channel fixed media, an interactive performance, by smartphones ensemble and laptop orchestras (PLOrk, NYU), in Berlin (Urban Solar Audio Plant, Orbis Festivals) and at Societé des Artes Technologiques in Montreal. The next Audio Chandelier installation work—“Mappings” will be created during an upcoming Harvestworks residency in late 2019.


HANS TAMMEN: ENDANGERED GUITAR

Hans Tammen likes to set sounds in motion, and then sitting back to watch the movements unfold. With dynamics, rhythm, timbral and spatial explorations as primary elements, his music is continuously shifting, with different layers floating into the foreground while others disappear. His music has been described as an alien world of bizarre textures and a journey through the land of unending sonic operations, Signal To Noise called his playing “…a killer tour de force of post-everything guitar damage”.

The “Endangered Guitar” is a hybrid interactive instrument meant to facilitate live sound processing, which grew out of an already decade long practice of Fred Frith-inspired "prepared guitar" performances. An interactive software developed since the year 2000, the analysis of the incoming guitar sounds is used as control source for the processing of the same sounds. Subsequent programming of more and more “uncertainties” into the response of the software (such as data from his own DNA analysis) resulted in performances that were using the instrument more like a “co-player”. It has been presented in hundreds of concerts; in 23 different countries on 4 continents; in solo to large ensemble settings; through stereo to multichannel sound systems including Wavefield Synthesis; in collaborative projects with dance, visuals, and theater; and across many different musical styles.

https://tammen.org/Endangered-Guitar-in-Musical-Instruments-in-the-21st-Century

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Dafna Naphtali is a sound-artist, vocalist, electronic musician and guitarist. A performer and composer of experimental, contemporary classical and improvised music since the mid-90’s, she creates custom Max/MSP programming for sound-processing of voice and other instruments, music for robots, “Audio Chandelier” multi-channel sound projects and “Walkie Talkie Dreams” audio augmented reality soundwalks in NY and Germany. “luminary” (Time Out) “extraordinary experimental vocalist” (Bruce Gallanter, Downtown Music Gallery. “Brilliant and dangerous” All Music Guide.Hans Tammen is currently teaching at School of Visual Arts, among other colleges. From 2001 to 2014 he has worked at Harvestworks Digital Media Art Center in NYC, where he was responsible for the Client Services, Education and Artist In Residence program, helping countless digital media artists through completion of their works. As an arbitrator at BTQ in the 1990s, he has has spent a decade advising unions about electronic monitoring and surveillance at the workplace, and negotiating contracts and agreements to minimize surveillance aspects. He received his undergraduate and graduate degrees from the University of Kassel, studying on a stipend from Friedrich Ebert Foundation.
http://dafna.info/

Hans Tammen's works have been presented on festivals in the US, Canada, Mexico, Russia, Ukraine, India, South Africa, the Middle East and all over Europe. He recorded on labels such as Clang, Innova, ESP-DISK, Nur/Nicht/Nur, Gold Bolus, Creative Sources, Leo Records, Potlatch and Outnow. He received grants and composer commissions from NewMusicUSA, MAPFund, Mid-Atlantic Arts Foundation, American Music Center, Lucas Artists Residencies Montalvo, New York State Council On The Arts (NYSCA), New York Foundation For The Arts (NYFA), American Composers Forum w/ Jerome Foundation, New York State Music Fund, Goethe Institute w/ Foreign Affairs Office, among others.
https://tammen.org/  More...

Thursday, May 23 2019 7:30 PM
Liveware is an audio-visual ensemble consisting of Shawn Lawson (graphics) and Michael Century (music), with Jeremy Stewart processing both graphics and sound using machine learning algorithms. Lawson is an expert practitioner of live-coding with graphics languages and environments he developed. Century performs on piano and accordion, and uses software he developed allowing live manipulations of performed material on both instruments.

http://www.shawnlawson.com/portfolio/liveware/

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Thu, May 23, 7:30pm
CCRMA Stage, The Knoll
FREE and Open to the Public
ccrma.stanford.edu/about/directions
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Shawn Lawson is a computational artist and researcher creating the computational sublime. He performs under the pseudonym Obi-Wan Codenobi where he live-codes real-time computer graphics with his open source software, The Force and The Dark Side. Lawson’s non-performance work explores a range of technology: stereoscopy, camera vision, touch screens, game controllers, hand-held devices, random number generators; and output formats: print, sculpture, mobile apps, instruction sets, animation, and interactive.

He has performed at NIME, Australia; Radical dB, Spain; ICLI, Portugal and UK; ICLC, UK, Canada, and Mexico; ISEA, Canada; GENERATE!, Germany; CultureHub, NYC, and more. Shawn’s artwork has exhibited or screened in museums, galleries, festivals, and public space in England, Denmark, Russia, Italy, Korea, Portugal, Spain, Brazil, Turkey, Malaysia, Iran, and Canada; locally in ACM SIGGRAPH, IEEE ProCams, ACM MM, The Art Institute of Chicago, Milwaukee Art Museum, Chelsea Art Museum, Eyebeam, Aperture Foundation Gallery, Nicholas Robinson Gallery, MIT, OSU, ASU, and LTU. He has given workshops in programming or live coding in Europe and the USA. Shawn is published in Dancecult Journal and the proceedings of ICLC, ACM CC, ACM SIGGRAPH, ACM SIGCHI, ACM MM.

Lawson studied fine arts at Carnegie Mellon University and École Nationale Supèrieure des Beaux-Arts. He received his MFA in Art and Technology Studies from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2003. He is a Professor of Computer Visualization in the Arts Department at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

www.shawnlawson.com

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Michael Century, pianist, accordionist, and composer, is Professor of New Media and Music in the Arts Department at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, which he joined in 2002. Musically at home in classical, contemporary, and improvisational settings, Century has enjoyed a varied career as university teacher, new media researcher, inter-arts producer, and arts policy maker (Banff Centre for the Arts (1979-93), McGill University (1998-2002), Government of Canada Canadian Heritage and Department of Industry 1993-98)). Century studied piano with Reginald Godden in Toronto, and holds degrees in musicology, from the Universities of Toronto and California at Berkeley. At the Banff Centre, he directed the Centre's inter-arts program, jazz and improvised music programs, and was the founding director of its Media Arts program. Century’s works for live and electronically processed instruments have been performed and broadcast in concerts and festivals internationally, including ISEA, The Music Gallery, Diapason Gallery and Le Poisson Rouge (New York City), Vancouver Jazz Festival, Banff Festival of the Arts, CBC’s Two New Hours.

www.michaelcentury.com

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Jeremy Stewart, is a multimedia artist and performer researching the affective potential of distributed multimedia systems through the creation of improvisational performances, wearable hardware, and machine learning-driven software. He is interested in the ways that technology can affect, interact with, and alter an individual’s agency, perception, and autonomy. He is a PhD Candidate at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

https://blindelephants.co/about/  More...

News:
05/20/2017

July 10-14
CCRMA Summer Workshop
Stanford University, CA
https://ccrma.stanford.edu/workshops/eae-2017

Electronic Arts Ensemble is designed for musicians, visual artists, programmers, designers, writers, dancers, actors, or artists of any discipline to collaboratively develop improvisatory performances using custom digital toolkits. 
 
The workshop will address topics including:
performance practices, with a focus on improvisation
music performance software (Max/MSP, Max4Live, Ableton Live, etc.)
video performance software (Jitter, Premiere Pro, After Effects, etc.)
hardware and sensors (Arduino, Kinect, MIDI controllers, etc.)
networked performance (OSC, JackTrip, etc.)


The schedule includes lectures, demos, discussions, and lab time. At the core of the workshop, daily group improvisations using customized toolkits will enable participants to develop a novel approach to their individual artistic practice. Participants are encouraged to experiment with the technology presented during the demos, and to engage with their peers in synergetic creation. The multidisciplinary ensemble will stage a public performance on the last day of the workshop.
 
Participants should either have an established artistic discipline, or have experience with programming and digital media. Both would be ideal, but not required. It is recommended that participants bring their own laptops and instruments, cameras, projectors, or other electronic gear.

About the instructors
 
Alex Chechile is an artist and composer whose work develops in parallel with research in neuroscience, psychoacoustics, and the biomechanics of hearing. His electroacoustic compositions and installations bring transparency to otherwise invisible processes in biology and technology. His work has been shown across the United States, Europe, and Asia. His projects have been supported by The New York State Council on the Arts (NYSCA), Harvestworks (NYC), Issue Project Room (NYC), the Experimental Television Center (NY), the Deep Listening Institute (NY), and the American Embassy. His work has been presented at MoMA, The 2011 New York Electronic Arts Festival, and SIGGRAPH San Diego. Alex performs in the SideLObe chamber laptop ensemble with Ge Wang, was a founding member of Pauline Oliveros' Tintinnabulate ensemble, collaborated with Mercury Rev, and opened for Primus. Chechile is a Ph.D. candidate at Stanford University’s Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA), and holds an MFA in Electronic Art from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and a BA in Music from Tufts University.
 
Constantin Basica is a Romanian composer living in the San Francisco Bay Area, whose current work explores perceptual illusions in the context of audiovisual performance. His compositions include pieces for solo instruments, chamber ensembles, orchestra, and opera. In recent years, he has been composing multimedia works for acoustic instruments, electronics, and video, which have been performed in Europe and in the United States by artists such as Séverine Ballon, Tony Arnold, Elision Ensemble, Ensemble Dal Niente, Ensemble Liminar, JACK Quartet, and Spektral Quartet. Constantin is the Alice Wilber Chapman graduate fellow at Stanford University, where he is working toward a D.M.A. in Composition. He received an M.A. degree in Multimedia Composition from the University of Music and Theater Hamburg, Germany, and two B.A. degrees in Composition and Conducting from the National University of Music Bucharest, Romania. As a teaching assistant at Stanford University, Constantin received the Chair’s Award for Excellence in Teaching in 2015. He was also one of the lecturers at the 2016 Sound and Music Computing Conference and Summer School in Hamburg, Germany.