Serving the San Francisco Bay Area New Music Community

                 

CCRMA

660 Lomita Dr.
Stanford CA 94305  
The Stanford Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA) is a multi-disciplinary facility where composers and researchers work together using computer-based technology both as an artistic medium and as a research tool.

Pronouncing "CCRMA":
CCRMA is an acronym for the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics it is pronounced "karma" (the first "c" is silent).

Areas of ongoing interest:
Composition, Applications Hardware, Applications Software, Synthesis Techniques and Algorithms, Physical Modeling, Music and Mobile Devices, Sensors, Real-Time Controllers, Signal Processing, Digital Recording and Editing, Psychoacoustics and Musical Acoustics, Perceptual Audio Coding, Music Information Retrieval, Audio Networking, Auditory Display of Multidimensional Data (Data Sonification), and Real-Time Applications.

The CCRMA community:
Administrative and technical staff, faculty, research associates, graduate research assistants, graduate and undergraduate students, visiting scholars, visiting researchers and composers, and industrial associates. Departments actively represented at CCRMA include Music, Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Computer Science, Physics, Art, Drama, and Psychology.

Center activities:
Academic courses, seminars, small interest group meetings, summer workshops and colloquia. Concerts of computer music are presented several times each year, including exchange concerts with area computer music centers. In-house technical reports and recordings are available, and public demonstrations of ongoing work at CCRMA are held periodically.

Research results:
Are published and presented at professional meetings, international conferences and in established journals including the Computer Music Journal, Journal of the Audio Engineering Society, the Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, and various transactions of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE). Compositions are presented in new music festivals and radio broadcasts throughout the world and have been recorded on cassette, LP, and compact disk.

CCRMA affiliation:
The Center for Computer Assisted Research in the Humanities (CCARH), also located at Stanford. CCARH conducts research on constructing computer databases for music, and on creating programs that allow researchers to access, analyze, print, and electronically perform the music. This focus is complementary to research at CCRMA in several ways.

Support for CCRMA:
The late Doreen B. Townsend, Walter Hewlett, the California Arts Council, the Ann and Gordon Getty Foundation, the Mellon Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Science Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation (for artists-in-residence), the System Development Foundation, Apple Computer, ATR Human Information Processing Research Labs, Aureal Semiconductor, Bio Control, Crystal Semiconductor, Digidesign, Dynacord, E-mu, Fast Mathematical Algorithms and Hardware, Fender Musical Instruments Corporation, Hewlett Packard, IBM Computer Music Center, Interval Research, ITRI CCL Taiwan, Kind of Loud Technologies, Korg, Matsushita, Media Vision, McDSP, NEC, NeXT Computer, Nokia Group, NTT Communication Science Laboratories, Opcode Systems, Philips Semiconductors, Rockwell International, Roland, Sony, Symbolics, Texas Instruments, Universal Audio/Kind of Loud Technologies, Xerox Palo Alto Research Center, Yamaha, Young Chang R&D Institute, Zeta Music Partners, and private gifts.
https://ccrma.stanford.edu/

Upcoming Events:
Wednesday, September 27 2017 7:30 PM
COLLISION STORIES is a four-piece abstract sound brigade based in San Francisco, CA.

Members: Jorge Bachmann, Bryan Day, Michael Gendreau, and Mason Jones.

Instruments may include: analog and digital synthesizers, guitar, bass, turntables, percussion, theremin, and handmade sound machines.

The four members of San Francisco's Collision Stories came together after having encountered each other over a number of years, crossing paths here and there as they wove their strands through the experimental, psychedelic, improvisational, electronics, and avant-garde scenes. Once they finally gathered and spent an evening engrossed in collective sound-making it was evident that their diverse backgrounds coalesced into something unique and intriguing.

It's not easy to draw a line around the territory staked out by Collision Stories. The four-piece draws from a vast array of inspirations and makes use of an equally wide range of techniques, sound sources, mechanisms, and most importantly imagination. The recordings and live performances are in perpetual motion, shifting from moments of hovering drone to rhythmic interpolations and cosmic sorcery. Entirely improvised, the work shows deep listening and careful interplay that can move in moments from intense energy to wide-open drifting expanses. It's common for the listener to encounter baffling collisions of sonics that lack an obvious origin, and it's not unusual for the members to listen back and be unsure who did what, and how.

The quartet is eternally restless, and no two works are the same as the quartet searches for the next moment of joyous sonic interlock. Inspiration can come from the location, an accident of wiring, the preceding artist's set, or a chance word while setting up. One member may randomly decide to bring an entirely new instrument one evening, or to string effects in reverse to see what happens. Coincidence and change are essential elements.

All of the members have extensive resumes they bring to bear, as musicians, composers, visual artists, writers, and creators in general.

Jorge Bachmann aka [ruidobello] has worked as a media artist, experimental composer, and curator. He is a founding member of MEI.collectiv, a multi­disciplinary group of artists. His eclectic work ranges from subtle musique concrete soundscapes to analog synth minimalism. Since the early 1980's he has been exploring the strange, unique and microcosmic sounds of everyday life, collecting field recordings and creating soundscapes meant for deep listening. In addition to Collision Stories he is one half of the synth duo Snowsteps.

Bryan Day is a sound artist, musical instrument designer, and conceptual artist. His sound work focuses on the subtle textural interplay of natural recordings and amplified electronic sounds generated by his invented instruments. Using scavenged electronics, repurposed mechanical components, and amplified materials that you might find in your garage or your great uncle's office, he re-imagines them into constructivist sound sculptures. In addition to his own audio work, he has run the Public Eyesore / Eh? labels since 1997.

Michael Gendreau started playing drums in 1972, and working with tape machines, scrappy electronics, and turntables a few years after that. He works as an acoustician, where his primary focus is on the design of very quiet research environments with respect to infrasound and vibration. He has worked both solo and in groups including Crawling With Tarts, rRope, Speed The Parting Guest, and others. His discography/videography contains more than 145 documented items since 1983. [website]

Mason Jones is an avant-garde and psych-noise musician, and owner/operator of the Charnel Music label since 1990. Primarily known as a multi-faceted guitarist, he recorded as Trance beginning in the late 80's, founded the band SubArachnoid Space with whom he recorded and toured from 1996-2002, and currently plays with Numinous Eye in addition to Collision Stories. He has also released numerous solo albums and collaborative works with Makoto Kawabata, Blue Sabbath Black Cheer, Astro, Monte Cazazza, and others.  More...

News:
05/20/2017

July 10-14
CCRMA Summer Workshop
Stanford University, CA
https://ccrma.stanford.edu/workshops/eae-2017

Electronic Arts Ensemble is designed for musicians, visual artists, programmers, designers, writers, dancers, actors, or artists of any discipline to collaboratively develop improvisatory performances using custom digital toolkits. 
 
The workshop will address topics including:
performance practices, with a focus on improvisation
music performance software (Max/MSP, Max4Live, Ableton Live, etc.)
video performance software (Jitter, Premiere Pro, After Effects, etc.)
hardware and sensors (Arduino, Kinect, MIDI controllers, etc.)
networked performance (OSC, JackTrip, etc.)


The schedule includes lectures, demos, discussions, and lab time. At the core of the workshop, daily group improvisations using customized toolkits will enable participants to develop a novel approach to their individual artistic practice. Participants are encouraged to experiment with the technology presented during the demos, and to engage with their peers in synergetic creation. The multidisciplinary ensemble will stage a public performance on the last day of the workshop.
 
Participants should either have an established artistic discipline, or have experience with programming and digital media. Both would be ideal, but not required. It is recommended that participants bring their own laptops and instruments, cameras, projectors, or other electronic gear.

About the instructors
 
Alex Chechile is an artist and composer whose work develops in parallel with research in neuroscience, psychoacoustics, and the biomechanics of hearing. His electroacoustic compositions and installations bring transparency to otherwise invisible processes in biology and technology. His work has been shown across the United States, Europe, and Asia. His projects have been supported by The New York State Council on the Arts (NYSCA), Harvestworks (NYC), Issue Project Room (NYC), the Experimental Television Center (NY), the Deep Listening Institute (NY), and the American Embassy. His work has been presented at MoMA, The 2011 New York Electronic Arts Festival, and SIGGRAPH San Diego. Alex performs in the SideLObe chamber laptop ensemble with Ge Wang, was a founding member of Pauline Oliveros' Tintinnabulate ensemble, collaborated with Mercury Rev, and opened for Primus. Chechile is a Ph.D. candidate at Stanford University’s Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA), and holds an MFA in Electronic Art from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and a BA in Music from Tufts University.
 
Constantin Basica is a Romanian composer living in the San Francisco Bay Area, whose current work explores perceptual illusions in the context of audiovisual performance. His compositions include pieces for solo instruments, chamber ensembles, orchestra, and opera. In recent years, he has been composing multimedia works for acoustic instruments, electronics, and video, which have been performed in Europe and in the United States by artists such as Séverine Ballon, Tony Arnold, Elision Ensemble, Ensemble Dal Niente, Ensemble Liminar, JACK Quartet, and Spektral Quartet. Constantin is the Alice Wilber Chapman graduate fellow at Stanford University, where he is working toward a D.M.A. in Composition. He received an M.A. degree in Multimedia Composition from the University of Music and Theater Hamburg, Germany, and two B.A. degrees in Composition and Conducting from the National University of Music Bucharest, Romania. As a teaching assistant at Stanford University, Constantin received the Chair’s Award for Excellence in Teaching in 2015. He was also one of the lecturers at the 2016 Sound and Music Computing Conference and Summer School in Hamburg, Germany.